By December 9, 2015 8 Comments Read More →

High Fructose Corn Syrup Now Hidden Under a New Name


Anna Hunt, Staff
Waking Times

Food producers have many tactics for hiding food ingredients which have become unpopular with consumers, and such has happened to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) following numerous scientific studies that have linked it to obesity, Type 2 diabetes and autism. In order to stop using the HFCS name in the ingredients list, food makers have taken to calling a sub-category of HFCS as “fructose syrup” or, plainly, “fructose”.

HFCS is a highly-processed chemical sweetener used in many processed foods, including breads, cookies, candy, condiments, and soft drinks. HFCS extends the shelf life of products, and it is often cheaper than sugar, which are the main reasons why manufacturers like it. But HFCS has gotten a bad rep, considering the circumstantial evidence that links it to various metabolic diseases, so Big Food and the Corn Refiners Association (CRA) decided to get creative.

HFCS is sub-categorized based on its fructose content. The “standard” HFCS – HFCS 42 or HFCS 55 – contains either 42 or 55 percent fructose. The new term “fructose” is now being used when foods contain the ingredient previously called HFCS-90, which has 90 percent fructose. Identifying HFCS-90 as “fructose” in the ingredients list gives food makers a green light to use statements such as “Contains No High Fructose Corn Syrup” or “No HFCS” on the product label, thus misleading buyers.

Here is CRA’s take:

“A third product, HFCS-90, is sometimes used in natural and ‘light’ foods, where very little is needed to provide sweetness. Syrups with 90% fructose will not state high fructose corn syrup on the label [anymore], they will state ‘fructose’ or ‘fructose syrup’.”

Scientific Discoveries about High Fructose Corn Syrup and Health

There’s a growing body of scientific evidence linking HFCS to metabolic disorders. Here is what scientists have discovered about the potential impact of HFCS on human health:

“Some people have claimed that high-fructose corn syrup is no different than other sweeteners when it comes to weight gain and obesity, but our results make it clear that this just isn’t true, at least under the conditions of our tests.” “When rats are drinking high-fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop, they’re becoming obese — every single one, across the board. Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don’t see this; they don’t all gain extra weight.” – Bart Hoebel, psychology professor at Princeton University (source:

“The study adds to a growing body of scientific literature that indicates HFCS consumption may result in negative health consequences distinct from and more deleterious than natural sugar.” – Dr. Michael I. Goran (source: Huffington Post)

“Consumption of HFCS may lead to mineral imbalances, including Zn [Zinc], Ca [Calcium] and P [Phosphorus] loss and Cu [Copper] gain and is a potential source of inorganic mercury exposure.” – Dufault et al. Clinical Epigenetics, 2012

“Data show that consumption of added sugars, particularly HFCS-55, negatively impacts hippocampal function, metabolic outcomes, and neuroinflammation when consumed in excess during the adolescent period of development.” – Hsu et al. Hippocampus, 2014

Although there has been no direct link established between HFCS and diabetes, obesity and autism, the circumstantial evidence that HFCS is a partial culprit in these widespread diseases cannot be overlooked.

It’s All About Marketing

Food producers aren’t new to deceiving the public to make their foods appear healthier than they really are. They will continue to do what they can to sell more products, even if that means re-categorizing and renaming synthetic ingredients. It’s called marketing, and the food industry spends billions on it each year to ensure that you hear and see the right message to make you comfortable with all the chemicals that end up in your food. Food marketers hide the reality under attractive labels with pretty pictures and tag lines such as “100% Pure” or “All natural”, making the ingredients list and nutritional information difficult to read and hidden in the far corners or back sides of packages.

“In the United States, food ingredient information is written for regulators and scientists, not for the average consumer.” – Anne Munoz-Furlong, founder of the nonprofit advocacy group Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network

It is up to you to stop being willfully ignorant to the marketing tricks of Big Food companies. Always read the ingredients list and familiarize yourself with food brands which demonstrate that they care about offering real, living foods, versus supporting companies that make food-like products full of synthetic additives such as HFCS-90.

About the Author

Anna Hunt is a staff writer for and an entrepreneur with over a decade of experience in research and editorial writing. She and her husband run a preparedness e-store outlet at, offering GMO-free storable food and emergency kits. Anna is also a certified Hatha yoga instructor. She enjoys raising her children and being a voice for optimal human health and wellness. Read more of her excellent articles here. Visit her essential oils store here.


This article (High Fructose Corn Syrup Now Hidden Under a New Name) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commons license with attribution to Anna Hunt and It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

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Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of WakingTimes or its staff.

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  • Pop_Korn

    There are many products that I put back of the shelve instead of purchasing after reading the ingredient list. I never purchase High Fructose Corn Syrup products and will not purchase products containing Fructose Syrup or Fructose. I also avoid MSG (monosodium glutamate). I hope there are enough folks like myself that can force the manufacturers into caring about the health of their customers. That will take boycotting those who place profits over health.

    • Ray

      There are soooo many products which contain high fructose corn syrup.

      • Joan Camara

        Not organic foods and drinks! Thats all I put in MY body.

  • jay

    High fructose corn is bad, gmo, non nourishing processed crap, I get that and agree. But could you please give us at least one example of one food producer that is doing this? This article was no help.

    • sunny733

      Actually, Jay, it was a lot of help. All one has to do is READ the ingredients on the label, and then you’ll know which food producers are trying to be sneaky.

      • Karl Baba

        actually it would be good to shame to producers and give people some buying guidance because not all “Fructose” on a label is HFCS-90

        • Ray

          Fructose in and of itself is not that bad, its the amount that people eat which is, because its in almost everything.

    • Joan Camara

      Pick up anything in the grocery store, and read the label….pretty much 99% of everything has it in the ingredients list. I eat and drink only organic.

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