What a Shaman Sees in A Mental Hospital

Shaman

Unknown South American Shaman of the Secoya Tribe – Image Source

Stephanie Marohn
Waking Times

The Shamanic View of Mental Illness

In the shamanic view, mental illness signals “the birth of a healer,” explains Malidoma Patrice Somé. Thus, mental disorders are spiritual emergencies, spiritual crises, and need to be regarded as such to aid the healer in being born.

What those in the West view as mental illness, the Dagara people regard as “good news from the other world.” The person going through the crisis has been chosen as a medium for a message to the community that needs to be communicated from the spirit realm. “Mental disorder, behavioral disorder of all kinds, signal the fact that two obviously incompatible energies have merged into the same field,” says Dr. Somé. These disturbances result when the person does not get assistance in dealing with the presence of the energy from the spirit realm.

One of the things Dr. Somé encountered when he first came to the United States in 1980 for graduate study was how this country deals with mental illness. When a fellow student was sent to a mental institute due to “nervous depression,” Dr. Somé went to visit him.

“I was so shocked. That was the first time I was brought face to face with what is done here to people exhibiting the same symptoms I’ve seen in my village.” What struck Dr. Somé was that the attention given to such symptoms was based on pathology, on the idea that the condition is something that needs to stop. This was in complete opposition to the way his culture views such a situation. As he looked around the stark ward at the patients, some in straitjackets, some zoned out on medications, others screaming, he observed to himself, “So this is how the healers who are attempting to be born are treated in this culture. What a loss! What a loss that a person who is finally being aligned with a power from the other world is just being wasted.”


Another way to say this, which may make more sense to the Western mind, is that we in the West are not trained in how to deal or even taught to acknowledge the existence of psychic phenomena, the spiritual world. In fact, psychic abilities are denigrated. When energies from the spiritual world emerge in a Western psyche, that individual is completely unequipped to integrate them or even recognize what is happening. The result can be terrifying. Without the proper context for and assistance in dealing with the breakthrough from another level of reality, for all practical purposes, the person is insane. Heavy dosing with anti-psychotic drugs compounds the problem and prevents the integration that could lead to soul development and growth in the individual who has received these energies.

On the mental ward, Dr Somé saw a lot of “beings” hanging around the patients, “entities” that are invisible to most people but that shamans and psychics are able to see. “They were causing the crisis in these people,” he says. It appeared to him that these beings were trying to get the medications and their effects out of the bodies of the people the beings were trying to merge with, and were increasing the patients’ pain in the process. “The beings were acting almost like some kind of excavator in the energy field of people. They were really fierce about that. The people they were doing that to were just screaming and yelling,” he said. He couldn’t stay in that environment and had to leave.

In the Dagara tradition, the community helps the person reconcile the energies of both worlds–”the world of the spirit that he or she is merged with, and the village and community.” That person is able then to serve as a bridge between the worlds and help the living with information and healing they need. Thus, the spiritual crisis ends with the birth of another healer. “The other world’s relationship with our world is one of sponsorship,” Dr. Somé explains. “More often than not, the knowledge and skills that arise from this kind of merger are a knowledge or a skill that is provided directly from the other world.”

The beings who were increasing the pain of the inmates on the mental hospital ward were actually attempting to merge with the inmates in order to get messages through to this world. The people they had chosen to merge with were getting no assistance in learning how to be a bridge between the worlds and the beings’ attempts to merge were thwarted. The result was the sustaining of the initial disorder of energy and the aborting of the birth of a healer.

“The Western culture has consistently ignored the birth of the healer,” states Dr. Somé. “Consequently, there will be a tendency from the other world to keep trying as many people as possible in an attempt to get somebody’s attention. They have to try harder.” The spirits are drawn to people whose senses have not been anesthetized. “The sensitivity is pretty much read as an invitation to come in,” he notes.

Those who develop so-called mental disorders are those who are sensitive, which is viewed in Western culture as oversensitivity. Indigenous cultures don’t see it that way and, as a result, sensitive people don’t experience themselves as overly sensitive. In the West, “it is the overload of the culture they’re in that is just wrecking them,” observes Dr. Somé. The frenetic pace, the bombardment of the senses, and the violent energy that characterize Western culture can overwhelm sensitive people.

Schizophrenia and Foreign Energy

With schizophrenia, there is a special “receptivity to a flow of images and information, which cannot be controlled,” stated Dr. Somé. “When this kind of rush occurs at a time that is not personally chosen, and particularly when it comes with images that are scary and contradictory, the person goes into a frenzy.”

What is required in this situation is first to separate the person’s energy from the extraneous foreign energies, by using shamanic practice (what is known as a “sweep”) to clear the latter out of the individual’s aura. With the clearing of their energy field, the person no longer picks up a flood of information and so no longer has a reason to be scared and disturbed, explains Dr. Somé.

Then it is possible to help the person align with the energy of the spirit being attempting to come through from the other world and give birth to the healer. The blockage of that emergence is what creates problems. “The energy of the healer is a high-voltage energy,” he observes. “When it is blocked, it just burns up the person. It’s like a short-circuit. Fuses are blowing. This is why it can be really scary, and I understand why this culture prefers to confine these people. Here they are yelling and screaming, and they’re put into a straitjacket. That’s a sad image.” Again, the shamanic approach is to work on aligning the energies so there is no blockage, “fuses” aren’t blowing, and the person can become the healer they are meant to be.

It needs to be noted at this point, however, that not all of the spirit beings that enter a person’s energetic field are there for the purposes of promoting healing. There are negative energies as well, which are undesirable presences in the aura. In those cases, the shamanic approach is to remove them from the aura, rather than work to align the discordant energies

Alex: Crazy in the USA, Healer in Africa

To test his belief that the shamanic view of mental illness holds true in the Western world as well as in indigenous cultures, Dr. Somé took a mental patient back to Africa with him, to his village. “I was prompted by my own curiosity to find out whether there’s truth in the universality that mental illness could be connected with an alignment with a being from another world,” says Dr. Somé.

Alex was an 18-year-old American who had suffered a psychotic break when he was 14. He had hallucinations, was suicidal, and went through cycles of dangerously severe depression. He was in a mental hospital and had been given a lot of drugs, but nothing was helping. “The parents had done everything–unsuccessfully,” says Dr. Somé. “They didn’t know what else to do.”

With their permission, Dr. Somé took their son to Africa. “After eight months there, Alex had become quite normal, Dr. Somé reports. He was even able to participate with healers in the business of healing; sitting with them all day long and helping them, assisting them in what they were doing with their clients . . . . He spent about four years in my village.” Alex stayed by choice, not because he needed more healing. He felt, “much safer in the village than in America.”

To bring his energy and that of the being from the spiritual realm into alignment, Alex went through a shamanic ritual designed for that purpose, although it was slightly different from the one used with the Dagara people. “He wasn’t born in the village, so something else applied. But the result was similar, even though the ritual was not literally the same,” explains Dr. Somé. The fact that aligning the energy worked to heal Alex demonstrated to Dr. Somé that the connection between other beings and mental illness is indeed universal.

After the ritual, Alex began to share the messages that the spirit being had for this world. Unfortunately, the people he was talking to didn’t speak English (Dr. Somé was away at that point). The whole experience led, however, to Alex’s going to college to study psychology. He returned to the United States after four years because “he discovered that all the things that he needed to do had been done, and he could then move on with his life.”

The last that Dr. Somé heard was that Alex was in graduate school in psychology at Harvard. No one had thought he would ever be able to complete undergraduate studies, much less get an advanced degree.

Dr. Somé sums up what Alex’s mental illness was all about: “He was reaching out. It was an emergency call. His job and his purpose was to be a healer. He said no one was paying attention to that.”

After seeing how well the shamanic approach worked for Alex, Dr. Somé concluded that spirit beings are just as much an issue in the West as in his community in Africa. “Yet the question still remains, the answer to this problem must be found here, instead of having to go all the way overseas to seek the answer. There has to be a way in which a little bit of attention beyond the pathology of this whole experience leads to the possibility of coming up with the proper ritual to help people.

Longing for Spiritual Connection

A common thread that Dr. Somé has noticed in “mental” disorders in the West is “a very ancient ancestral energy that has been placed in stasis, that finally is coming out in the person.” His job then is to trace it back, to go back in time to discover what that spirit is. In most cases, the spirit is connected to nature, especially with mountains or big rivers, he says.

In the case of mountains, as an example to explain the phenomenon, “it’s a spirit of the mountain that is walking side by side with the person and, as a result, creating a time-space distortion that is affecting the person caught in it.” What is needed is a merger or alignment of the two energies, “so the person and the mountain spirit become one.” Again, the shaman conducts a specific ritual to bring about this alignment.

Dr. Somé believes that he encounters this situation so often in the United States because “most of the fabric of this country is made up of the energy of the machine, and the result of that is the disconnection and the severing of the past. You can run from the past, but you can’t hide from it.” The ancestral spirit of the natural world comes visiting. “It’s not so much what the spirit wants as it is what the person wants,” he says. “The spirit sees in us a call for something grand, something that will make life meaningful, and so the spirit is responding to that.”

That call, which we don’t even know we are making, reflects “a strong longing for a profound connection, a connection that transcends materialism and possession of things and moves into a tangible cosmic dimension. Most of this longing is unconscious, but for spirits, conscious or unconscious doesn’t make any difference.” They respond to either.

As part of the ritual to merge the mountain and human energy, those who are receiving the “mountain energy” are sent to a mountain area of their choice, where they pick up a stone that calls to them. They bring that stone back for the rest of the ritual and then keep it as a companion; some even carry it around with them. “The presence of the stone does a lot in tuning the perceptive ability of the person,” notes Dr. Somé. “They receive all kinds of information that they can make use of, so it’s like they get some tangible guidance from the other world as to how to live their life.”

When it is the “river energy,” those being called go to the river and, after speaking to the river spirit, find a water stone to bring back for the same kind of ritual as with the mountain spirit.

“People think something extraordinary must be done in an extraordinary situation like this,” he says. That’s not usually the case. Sometimes it is as simple as carrying a stone.

A Sacred Ritual Approach to Mental Illness

One of the gifts a shaman can bring to the Western world is to help people rediscover ritual, which is so sadly lacking. “The abandonment of ritual can be devastating. From the spiritual view, ritual is inevitable and necessary if one is to live,” Dr. Somé writes in Ritual: Power, Healing, and Community. “To say that ritual is needed in the industrialized world is an understatement. We have seen in my own people that it is probably impossible to live a sane life without it.”

Dr. Somé did not feel that the rituals from his traditional village could simply be transferred to the West, so over his years of shamanic work here, he has designed rituals that meet the very different needs of this culture. Although the rituals change according to the individual or the group involved, he finds that there is a need for certain rituals in general.

One of these involves helping people discover that their distress is coming from the fact that they are “called by beings from the other world to cooperate with them in doing healing work.” Ritual allows them to move out of the distress and accept that calling.

Another ritual need relates to initiation. In indigenous cultures all over the world, young people are initiated into adulthood when they reach a certain age. The lack of such initiation in the West is part of the crisis that people are in here, says Dr. Somé. He urges communities to bring together “the creative juices of people who have had this kind of experience, in an attempt to come up with some kind of an alternative ritual that would at least begin to put a dent in this kind of crisis.”

Another ritual that repeatedly speaks to the needs of those coming to him for help entails making a bonfire, and then putting into the bonfire “items that are symbolic of issues carried inside the individuals . . . It might be the issues of anger and frustration against an ancestor who has left a legacy of murder and enslavement or anything, things that the descendant has to live with,” he explains. “If these are approached as things that are blocking the human imagination, the person’s life purpose, and even the person’s view of life as something that can improve, then it makes sense to begin thinking in terms of how to turn that blockage into a roadway that can lead to something more creative and more fulfilling.”

The example of issues with an ancestors touches on rituals designed by Dr. Somé that address a serious dysfunction in Western society and in the process “trigger enlightenment” in participants. These are ancestral rituals, and the dysfunction they are aimed at is the mass turning-of-the-back on ancestors. Some of the spirits trying to come through, as described earlier, may be “ancestors who want to merge with a descendant in an attempt to heal what they weren’t able to do while in their physical body.”

“Unless the relationship between the living and the dead is in balance, chaos ensues,” he says. “The Dagara believe that, if such an imbalance exists, it is the duty of the living to heal their ancestors. If these ancestors are not healed, their sick energy will haunt the souls and psyches of those who are responsible for helping them.” The rituals focus on healing the relationship with our ancestors, both specific issues of an individual ancestor and the larger cultural issues contained in our past. Dr. Somé has seen extraordinary healing occur at these rituals.

Taking a sacred ritual approach to mental illness rather than regarding the person as a pathological case gives the person affected–and indeed the community at large–the opportunity to begin looking at it from that vantage point too, which leads to “a whole plethora of opportunities and ritual initiative that can be very, very beneficial to everyone present,” states. Dr. Somé.

Excerpted from:  The Natural Medicine Guide to Schizophrenia (Chapter 9), and The Natural Medicine Guide to Bipolar Disorder (Chapter 10). Stephanie Marohn.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is not intended to replace medical care.  You need to consult your doctor regarding any change in your medication. The author and publisher disclaim any responsibility for how you choose to employ the information in this books and the result or consequences of any of the treatments covered. 

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  • Tracy Semonik

    So interesting! From the point of view of a nurse with psychiatric ward and Emergency Room experience, I feel this could be true in a large majority of cases. But to deny that psychosis exists at all would be as dangerous as, say, my doctor who refused to treat a psychotic teen because he was on drugs- only to have him return from drug rehab with hallucinations multiplied tenfold! (he was self-medicating- 17 yrs and I will always remember that kid and the way that MD treated him) When you walk onto psych wards over and over there comes a time when you can just “sense” organic psychosis and tell it from something else. I often feel some of the agitation and behavioral aspects of mental illness are being caused by the medications being used to treat the patients or by the frustration that no one ever listens, attempts to understand or takes them seriously. There is a spiritual aspect, I’m sure. Perhaps a metaphysical one as well.
    My point? Medications will always work- they have been designed to do so by changing brain chemistry and despite causing life-altering side-effects, we consider halting actively harmful psychosis a victory for modern medicine. But maybe we can do better by delaying the treatment of these folks with chemical means (in a controlled, safe environment, of course) and treating them holistically, mind, body and spirit. We would do well to look to other cultures for alternate ways to heal our mentally ill before we medicate them into permanent disability.

    • Aye, there is a time and place for everything. It’s just a matter of finding out how to balance it right in each individual case because too much in either direction can be bad for them.

  • http://qt.com/a-man-who-knows-how-to-live.mod

    FILLING YOUR SELF WITH TRUTH AND LIGHT LEAVES NO PLACE FOR EVIL TO EXIST IN YOU OR TO HURT YOU.

  • I would like to add a rather lengthy but important note of caution from a Western healer’s perspective: When I first commenced my training as a healer at age 13, I was taught and read much about the danger to especially energy healers resulting from working with the severely mentally disabled. I was basically taught to keep my hands off them and never go into that work at all. At the time it struck me much like people speaking of it almost as if it were a contagious disease, a healer could catch from exposure or contact with the afflicted person. Ironically, this isn’t far from the truth. However, it is not the disease or mental affliction an unprepared healer may catch but that which is attached to the one who suffers from such ailments. As per the above article, some energies are to be integrated by the “healer being born” but some are detrimental to health and wellbeing of both shaman/healer and sufferer and must therefore be removed. Unfortunately, many healers in the Western world have not been trained in seeing the worlds of energy they actually work with. As a result, they are often unprepared for that which lies deep within their clients. I have heard many stories of healers working with a client and suddenly being confronted with what was clearly an attached dark entity or a whole group of them. Instead of being prepared for such an event and taking necessary precautions before and during their treatments, or even just knowing how to deal with the situation in the moment, they literally freaked out and ran, thereby opening the door wide for that very entity or group to enter them in turn. This is just one example of ignorance leading to serious consequences for well-meaning Light Workers and their clients. So to relate this to the article shared here, I would suggest to anyone who is aiming to work with the severely mentally ill, to first train themselves in seeing the worlds the shaman speaks of and to know deep down, they are truly suited to and ready for handling that which may end up fighting back, while remaining calm and in full charge of their own faculties. Work with such issues is not for the faint-hearted or those who are likely to fall into fear. It is spiritual warrior’s work. Some people are wonderful healers but no warriors and some are warriors but not healers. It takes a very specific kind of being to be both in balance. Being honest with oneself about which category your presently align with, is as crucial for the sake of the client/patient as it is for the practitioner.

    • Anonymous

      Thank you for your comment and for adding a Western healers perspective!

  • Sunny

    This makes sense. Great article. What I don’t understand is the difference between a good spiritual entity – or mountain or river – and a demonic spirit that causes pain. Any answers?

    • Erica Nicole

      I cannot say that any spirit which attaches itself or tries to merge with another person is a good spirit because that affects our free will. However, I do think there are spirits that mean well, and those that definitely do not, or are there for selfish purposes.

      Any spirit that hangs around, and is not obviously sent from God to protect you, is ultimately robbing you of energy whether they mean to or not. Even if they are kind and don’t bother you; this is because they are stuck and have not moved on. But, I do think that these are often seen as good spirits because they try to help, or just hang out with the person.

      “Demonic” spirits, in my opinion, are any spirit that hangs around for the purpose of using the person, actively seeking to negatively impact their life. Spirits like this often lie, deceive, and try to trick the person into thinking that the spirit is something it is not. They often try to pass as a real good spirit- an angel, or messenger from the beyond. They often promise things that of course they cannot deliver, they use flattery, and twist truth.

      True good, angelic spirits are around us often, but they very rarely make their presence known. These are spirits sent by God to watch over us generally, and often are our ancestors. But, again, it is rare for them to actually show themselves, and they would never cause depression or mental illness. Then there are spirits sent for specific tasks, such as to save us from accident, or send us a wake-up call. These we tend to notice more often.

      Anywho, that’s my 2 cents.

      • Simon Osen

        Mentioned God, sent off a christian vibe and then unworthiness showed up, two paragraphs in. The bad spirits are sent by the devil, the good spirits are invisible and rare, and only the worthy/special can truly appreciate or know them. Thats not your two cents. Thats two cents sent through history over and over again. Repeated. The worthy and the unworthy

        • Erica Nicole

          I never said anything about being worthy or unworthy. You’re casting your own light onto my words here, for sure. I also did not say spirits that were good were rare– I said they are around us all the time. I said it’s rare for them to manifest themselves. And I said nothing about the ‘specialness’ of anyone they do manifest to. Good tends to be done in the background without drawing attention to itself. It’s my opinion that good spirits manifest only under need. And often they don’t need to be seen to do their positive work. Take a step back sir, and try to see my comments without your prejudice.

  • Mer

    Great article. It’s true the West, especially America, has lost touch with Nature because the Machine is trying to supersede it, to the detriment of all. Our society has lost touch with Nature and until that relationship is restored, society will continue to decline.

  • Dean

    Norman bergrun, the ringmakers of saturn, has a Schizophrenic son. Mr. Bergrun says its just another universe. One that the masses here choose not to understand or accept.

  • Anon

    What a load of bollocks

    • SBeth

      I agree. This is complete crap that is not anchored in any scientific reality. People believe what they want to believe in order to bolster their self esteem.

  • Bad-Clown
  • Anonymous

    This article raises many questions; thanks for posting

  • Fabulous article, so clear and compelling. We have so much to learn in the West about health and healing, and at the root of it is accepting that we are all energetic / spiritual beings. As a sensitive healer myself, this article inspires me to take my calling more seriously. Thank you.

  • SteveB

    Decades of using drugs to treat mental illness have done little to help us understand or ‘cure’ the problem in our Western culture. We are so sure that our way is the right way. Maybe we need to open our minds.

  • A. M.

    My son died from his mental illness. His brain was overwhelmed by the messages and images combined with society’s ways of life. I spent a lot of time with him, as much as he wanted, as much as I could, and his talk was all spiritual. He was so intelligent, talented and very connected to the spirit realm, kindness and love. I tried to encourage him to try the drugs because I wanted him to be able to function in the world but he refused. He said “doctors don’t know God.” He was correct. I miss his physical presence here. He left me with some incredibly beautiful writings and drawings, but most of all the love he shared. I always thought he knew something amazing and was trying to get the message out to the world.

  • Meter

    A very valuable perspective.

    Yet just as western doctors view mental illness as mere disorders, Dr. Somé seems to view western culture’s collective mental illness as merely a disorder and dysfunction as well. For example, this article implies that he views loss of ritual, a frenzied and distracted atmosphere, the turning of the backs toward the ancestors, etc., as causative, unfortunate coincidences and conditions, “based on pathology, on the idea that the condition is something that needs to stop.”

    Yet it says, “This was in complete opposition to the way his culture views such a situation” and, “What a loss that a person who is finally being aligned with a power from the other world is just being wasted.”

    Perhaps Dr. Somé and others should view western culture itself, with it yelling and screaming and dysfunction, as “a person who is finally being aligned with a power from the other world”, rather than merely a culture that needs to be fixed, just as he advises with individuals.

    It seems he would seek to return to traditional values and make western culture ‘behave right’, just as doctors and parents of the mentally ill merely want a return to the traditional and conventional. Yet perhaps there is something larger going on here than mere dysfunction, and western culture is not destined to return to the past.

    Thus in a sense this article is pointing out what most of us already know about western culture and its ills, and saying ‘change that’. Yet changing that on a large scale is the real challenge, and for that he offers no practical solutions. It’s not an accident that westerners are driven to distraction, exploited, and have lost their ancestors. That is the challenge.

    I too have noted that traumas healed produce not merely a return of the functionality that was lost, but true growth. Thus I too have come to see dysfunction in this way, as a healer or greater being emerging. It is an aspect of growth, and need not be experienced as suffering.

    It should also be noted that most of the emotional traumas that create mental illness, result not merely from childhood experiences, but are brought into this life as seeds to be planted. That is to say, we are not merely victims of our parents, etc – our past reflected who we were, as well as who our tormentors and failed teachers were. We arrived being already part of the problem. We are they.

    • Mandy

      Malidome Some does provide solutions – this particular article just did not go into what they were. He is working here in the US trying to give a foundation of knowledge by teaching ritual and healing ceremonies. Basic research about his current activities will tell you he is providing solutions for healing. I have read his autobiography. He was sent here to build a bridge of understanding to the Western world.

  • Anonymous

    This is an interesting perspective, I really hope the medical community is taking note of this powerful insight from Dr. Some. It’s a definite lead into furthering my own personal investigative research into this field of study. My background is one of a, “recovering mental patient” (lol), as I’m labeled a “schizo-affective” which means most of the time I’m “normal” but have had bouts of “psychosis” in my life, the most recent one being this year… So considering that, read on:

    In my last episode, I had profound experiences in what I now consider as, “body enlightenment”… that is, where all my senses were enhanced, and where my own full awareness of my body were recognized for the first time, for example I could feel muscles in my feet that I couldn’t before and manipulate them for the first time so as to gain traction and balance…

    Those were the positive effects of my “then” condition… the negative effects were of those that were mentioned in the article, maybe not as severe as the screaming and hallucinating part, but nonetheless I was being, what seemed, as this article points out, tormented. It was awful…

    I experienced two states of mind that would switch from being in a complete state of bliss, where I was at peace with myself and others, to a state of paranoia and trauma, where I felt actual stabs of pain through out my body. It was one of my most bizarre and scariest moments in my life that I’ve ever experienced, to date… as a side-note, before my episode, I was not under the influence of any sort of drugs unless you consider a “whole foods diet”, as such (/sarc).

    You see, I went from being out-of-the-mental-system for 4 yrs to suddenly caught into it and of course I was prescribed drugs… go figure… but at least I knew my rights and they worked with me, so I just took the minimum dose as required, which worked out great. The facility I was at specializes in trauma so I was able to get a lot of individual and group therapy which helped me out tremendously to stabilize, but I left the place confused at to what the hell just happened to me and how to safeguard myself from it (the episode) happening again. And that’s what I believe is wrong with our Mental Health System. They are clueless…

    Later in out-patient therapy, I had a psychologist harp on me for 2 months about not taking my medication as prescribed because they were literally inducing zombie-like states into me (not the eating flesh part, lol). I was told that my schizophrenic tendencies disabled me as a normal functioning human and that I would need to be on medication for the rest of my life. In response I posed the question,

    “What if I’m not schizophrenic but rather just experienced a spiritual crisis of some sort?”…

    As a side-note I had been reading up trying to find out if any other “mental patients” had ever experienced what I did and came across some medical literature concerning “Kundalini Syndrome” A/K/A “Kundalani Awakening” within the yoga community. So I mentioned this to my therapist as well, their response, “If you’re not purposefully and intentionally trying to have some sort of ‘spiritual experience’ then it’s not a spiritual crisis.”

    So anyway, as an agnostic myself, this article is very thought-provoking as I’m caught into this same situation, off-guard, not believing in meta-physical spirits yet experiencing physical phenomena which science cannot yet explain.

    Great Article and hopefully I didn’t over complicate this… Any thoughts?

    • Lynne

      I’d like to know how many episodes you have a year and if you’ve changed your diet.

    • Susan

      All of the experiences you are talking about show common signs of demonic attack. This is the elephant in the room no one seems to have any knowledge or awareness of. Even science, medicine and spiritual practitioners and also evidently shamans, as we see from the above, have no idea. They mention the merging of two incongruent energies, but do not mention that this is basically a demonic entity in the energy field attempting to invade the body and mind.
      Unfortunately this is very common these days and the majority of mental episodes and anxiety disorders and OCD’s are caused/enhanced by these entities.

      These parasites suck out energy and cause disease, and mental disturbance, violent thoughts and pains in the body. They are attracted to people who have lost power in any way, those who have suffered trauma (whole population), sexual abuse, fear, prolonged negativity, drug addiction, sex with hosted people and those who have been host for entities in their past lives, (they carry through life to life) which means that most people on this planet now have multiple entities in and around them.
      Its time peel learned how to see and get rid of these things a giant exorcism of this planet is needed now.
      The more we expose the machinations of evil the less powerful their grip on the population will be.
      if you want to talk about this anonymous, then email arcania@risup.net
      In Fortitude.

      • Meter

        In my view the reason you don’t see healers focusing on attached entities is because that is a religious practice, which like conventional medicine fighting disease, tries to fight a negative. Rather than fight disease, promote health. Then negative attachments have nothing to feed on. You don’t need to irradicate them (a religious approach to life – trying to vanquish evil).

        I have seen that people, particularly as children, choose negative entities as allies. The consciousnesses share a state of mind, perhaps to get revenge, etc. Such desires can be quite dark.

        When the trauma is revisited and healed, the nature of the negative attachment can be seen to change. Sometimes it merely leaves, yet often it seems an ally remains even in health. Yet the ally turns out to be capable of ‘goodness’ as well.

        Thus it can be said that it is difficult to discern a demon from an angel. At our level of awareness, many people simply become frightened by other-worldly power, regardless of its true nature. This fear in itself, like all fear, attracts that which it fears.

        Also, fighting as you propose involves a belief in victimhood, which is not the truth of us.

        Bring a very patient, healing light of awareness to places where negative attachments form. Promote healing (transformation), just be being with it consciously. There is no need to fight demons, except in the sense of resisting negative thoughts within oneself, or at least observing them from another detached level. Be a vigilant observer of yourself.

      • findingmyplace

        Thank you for talking about this! I was spiritually oppressed by “demonic forces” for several years. I’m not big on religion but there are energies out there that can help us or harm us. Religion uses the word “demons” and spirits, I tend to think in terms of energy and vibrations. I never went to the doctor because at the time I had no clue I was under attack till several years later and my parents never thought I has a problem, just a quiet and shy kid. I started off as having anxiety and just wanting to be alone most of the time. Then I started having nightmares and feeling like i was being sexually attacked but I thought it was just my imagination working overtime. I started researching one day and read about incubus and thought that could be what was in my aura but I thought just not focusing on them and staying positive would make them leave me alone. five years later at the age of 25, I started having psychosis symptoms and felt like something was trying to take over my brain. I still didn’t go to the hospital because i already know how the system runs. I seeked out witches and healers who could help. Some were frauds but I did come across a few good ones that helped eradicate some of the energy in my aura. He mentioned that I was severely under attack for the last ten years and a spirit was trying to possess me. I’m still in the process of healing and regularly seeing energy healers to make sure i’m clear. I’ve been researching many holistic modalities, crystals, and herbs that actually help heal and protect people. I gained soo much insight over the past two years that I’m actually thankful for the dark experience. I guess this article is right when he talked about a “birth of a healer”. I’m hoping one day I can share my gift to the world and be that healer waiting for a lost soul in crisis.
        One thing that really helped me was zeolite. It was really something that the universe blessed me with. I am able to chat with anyone wanting to talk or needs advice. 😀
        allthngsholistic@gmail.com

    • crystal

      I went through the same around 1985 after a bout of Yuppie Flu where I could barely move for 6 weeks… I suddenly started seeing Aura’s.. could hear the high pitched squeals from plants when they needed water… all the solids eg.. walls and floors seemed to be moving energy.. I could see meridian lines from my hands that looked like strings of champagne bubbles.. .. I was too scared to go out for a couple of years as I was more sensitive to everything.. The weird inexplicable pains .. I worked out were empathic.. that other people were experiencing..

  • rb

    Wonderful article, and very sad. I know several natural healers who were nearly murdered by big pharma. No wonder why the West is full of sick and crazy people, they kill their healers.

    • Anon

      This is an interesting perspective, I really hope the medical community is taking note of this powerful insight from Dr. Some. It’s a definite lead into furthering my own personal investigative research into this field of study. My background is one of a, “recovering mental patient” (lol), as I’m labeled a “schizo-affective” which means most of the time I’m “normal” but have had bouts of “psychosis” in my life, the most recent one being this year… So considering that, read on:

      In my last episode, I had profound experiences in what I now consider as, “body enlightenment”… that is, where all my senses were enhanced, and where my own full awareness of my body were recognized for the first time, for example I could feel muscles in my feet that I couldn’t before and manipulate them for the first time so as to gain traction and balance…

      Those were the positive effects of my “then” condition… the negative effects were of those that were mentioned in the article, maybe not as severe as the screaming and hallucinating part, but nonetheless I was being, what seemed, as this article points out, tormented. It was awful…

      I experienced two states of mind that would switch from being in a complete state of bliss, where I was at peace with myself and others, to a state of paranoia and trauma, where I felt actual stabs of pain through out my body. It was one of my most bizarre and scariest moments in my life that I’ve ever experienced, to date… as a side-note, before my episode, I was not under the influence of any sort of drugs unless you consider a “whole foods diet”, as such (/sarc).

      You see, I went from being out-of-the-mental-system for 4 yrs to suddenly caught into it and of course I was prescribed drugs… go figure… but at least I knew my rights and they worked with me, so I just took the minimum dose as required, which worked out great. The facility I was at specializes in trauma so I was able to get a lot of individual and group therapy which helped me out tremendously to stabilize, but I left the place confused at to what the hell just happened to me and how to safeguard myself from it (the episode) happening again. And that’s what I believe is wrong with our Mental Health System. They are clueless…

      Later in out-patient therapy, I had a psychologist harp on me for 2 months about not taking my medication as prescribed because they were literally inducing zombie-like states into me (not the eating flesh part, lol). I was told that my schizophrenic tendencies disabled me as a normal functioning human and that I would need to be on medication for the rest of my life. In response I posed the question,

      “What if I’m not schizophrenic but rather just experienced a spiritual crisis of some sort?”…

      As a side-note I had been reading up trying to find out if any other “mental patients” had ever experienced what I did and came across some medical literature concerning “Kundalini Syndrome” A/K/A “Kundalani Awakening” within the yoga community. So I mentioned this to my therapist as well, their response, “If you’re not purposefully and intentionally trying to have some sort of ‘spiritual experience’ then it’s not a spiritual crisis.”

      So anyway, as an agnostic myself, this article is very thought-provoking as I’m caught into this same situation, off-guard, not believing in meta-physical spirits yet experiencing physical phenomena which science cannot yet explain.

      Great Article and hopefully I didn’t over complicate this… Any thoughts?

      • Liz

        I know many people who had one or more unsought spiritual experience.

        Your therapist is contradicting basic Christianity (just to put the topic on familiar ground for many English speakers). Every Christian denomination teaches that Saul/Paul on Damascus road had an unsought overwhelming life-changing (awareness of the nature of reality changing) spiritual experience. Many traditional Christian saints throughout church history had unsought visions.

        Taking it broader, sociologist Andrew Greeley said his research showed over half of Americans have at least one unsought mystical experience, including about a third of Americans experience a visit (usually just one visit I think) from a recently dead loved one (most commonly a spouse).

        I don’t mean to make this discussion about Christianity, but about the commonality of an unsought spiritual experience. Many such experiences are comforting, but some are quite challenging especially if they reveal unexpected aspects of reality that require some adjusting to!

        Your therapist is out of touch with reality and with his own broad culture. Change therapists. Find one who respects your experience and can help you work through it’s meaning/lessons/invitation.

      • crystal

        A lot of similar explorations of Kundalani awakening is explored at the Institute of Noetic Sciences. It may help your explorations in this field. http://noetic.org/

      • crystal
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