Search Results for Roundup

12 Ways to Rid the Planet of GMOs and Monsanto’s Roundup

Ronnie Cummins – It is now blatantly obvious that genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are nothing more than patented Pesticide Delivery Systems (PDS) designed to increase sales of poisonous agrochemicals such as Roundup, glufosinate…

New Study Shows Why Roundup Herbicide (Glyphosate) Should Be Banned

Sayer Ji, Green Med Info Waking Times A growing body of research indicates that Roundup herbicide and its metabolite, AMPA, are vastly more toxic than the public is being told. Activist sentiment aside, the scientific research itself increasingly points to banning this herbicide as the only logical solution. A concerning new study published in Chemosphere shows that

Monsanto’s Roundup Found in 75% of Air and Rain Samples

John Deike, EcoWatch Waking Times A new U.S. Geological Survey has concluded that pesticides can be found in, well, just about anything. Roundup herbicide, Monsanto’s flagship weed killer, was present in 75 percent of air and rainfall test samples, according to the study, which focused on Mississippi’s highly fertile Delta agricultural region. GreenMedInfo reports new research, soon to be published

“Extreme” Levels of Roundup Detected in Food—Are You Eating This Toxic Contaminant?

Dr. Mercola Waking Times In 2009, a French court found Monsanto guilty of lying; falsely advertising its Roundup herbicide as “biodegradable,” “environmentally friendly” and claiming it “left the soil clean.” We’re now starting to understand just how false such statements are. For example, last summer, a groundbreaking study revealed a previously unknown mechanism of harm from glyphosate, the active

Extreme Levels of Monsanto’s Roundup Herbicide Found in Soy Plants

Emily Cassidy, Environmental Working Group Waking Times A new study led by scientists from the Arctic University of Norway has detected “extreme levels” of Roundup, the agricultural herbicide manufactured by Monsanto, in genetically engineered (GE) soy. The study, coming out in June’s issue of Food Chemistry and available online, looked at 31 different soybean plants on Iowa farms and compared