How to Help One of Nature’s Most Noble Creatures – The Hawksbill Sea Turtle

May 18, 2013 | By | Reply More

Hawksbill11Waking Times

It is often easy to look at the problems in the world without seeing ways in which you can actively participate in solutions. Finding opportunities to roll up your sleeves and do some good in this world can be a very difficult thing to do, and for those who have lost a connection to the natural world, it can seem impossible to pitch in for Mother Earth while living an urban lifestyle, working 40+ hours a week, and commuting.

The Hawksbill Sea Turtle is one of nature’s most noble and graceful creatures, and also one of its most sensitive. They inspire awe and emit grace, and it’s saddening to look at the threats facing these animals and to consider how much longer they can survive under the myriad threats they face.

Sea turtle eggs are routinely scooped out of the sand by local populations for consumption, for sale, and to serve the ego of man, as it is customary in many places to eat their eggs as a means of  improving male vigor and potency. In addition to the assault on their ability to reproduce, industrial fishing, ocean pollution from trash, plastics, chemical pollutants, and commercial hunting for the trade of its glorious shell, are rapidly decimating the turtle.

Without a greater change in mankind’s attitude towards sea life, the future for these creatures is grim, yet some nations, organizations and individuals are taking measures to protect sea turtles from these assaults by protecting the habitats in which turtles lay and hatch their eggs.

After the unexplained deaths of over 280 sea turtles in Costa Rica this January, Waking Times was contacted by Fundación Osa, a non-profit organization with conservation projects in Ecuador and Costa Rica, with a request to help out this noble creature by spreading information about it, and offering our viewers a look at how you can become personally involved in helping the sea turtle. The following information is from Jonathon Miller-Weisberger, founder of Fundación Osa, author of Rainforest Medicine: Preserving Indigenous Science and Biodiversity in the Upper Amazon, ethno-botanist, and sea turtle conservationist, working directly with the critically endangered Hawksbill sea turtles on the Pacific Coast of the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica.

Please enjoy this look at these beautiful creatures and consider how volunteering or donating to wildlife rescue groups can be an inspiring wa to re-connect with nature and make an important difference in our world.

laying-eggs-168x300Hawksbill Turtles

Current Status

The hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) is listed as a critically endangered species by the IUCN. It is also listed as endangered throughout its range by the Endangered Species Act of 1973. An exhaustive review of the worldwide conservation status concluded that the global hawksbill population is known to be declining. Severe declines were noted across the globe.

It is sobering to consider that current nesting levels may be far lower than previously estimated. Despite protective legislation, international trade in hawksbill shells and subsistence use of meat and eggs continue unabated in many countries and pose a significant threat to the survival of the species in the region. The most recent status review of the hawksbill in Costa Rica recognized that numerous threats still exist despite decades of protection.

Description

The hawksbill’s appearance is similar to that of other marine turtles. It has a generally flattened body shape, a protective carapace, and flipper-like arms, adapted for swimming in the open ocean. E. imbricata is easily distinguished from other sea turtles by its sharp, curving beak with prominent tomium, and the saw-like appearance of its shell margins. Hawksbill shells slightly change colors, depending on water temperature. While this turtle lives part of its life in the open ocean, it spends more time in shallow lagoons and coral reefs.

The following combination of characteristics distinguishes the hawksbill from other marine turtles:

  • two pairs of prefrontal scales
  • thick, posteriorly overlapping scutes on the carapace
  • four pairs of costal scutes (the anteriormost not in contact with the nuchal scute)
  • two claws on each flipper
  • a beak-like mouth, hence the name.

Additionally, on land the hawksbill has an alternating gait, unlike the leatherback and green sea turtles.

The carapace is heart-shaped in the youngest turtles and becomes more elongated as the turtle matures. The sides and rear portions of the carapace are sharply serrated in all but very old animals. The epidermal scutes that overlay the bones are the tortoiseshell so prized by commerce. Hawksbill shells are the primary source of tortoiseshell material used for decorative purposes.

Habitat

Hawksbills use different habitats at different stages of their life cycle. It is widely believed that posthatchling hawksbills are pelagic and take shelter in weedlines around convergence zones. Marine plants and floating debris such as styrofoam, tar balls, and plastic bits (all common components of weedlines) are consistently and sadly found in the stomachs of youngsters.

ARKive image GES058795 - Hawksbill turtleHawksbills reenter coastal waters when they reach about 20-25 cm carapace length. Coral reefs are the resident foraging grounds for juveniles, subadults and adults. Hawksbills exist on the diet of sponges–commonly found on the solid substrate of reef systems. Ledges and caves of reef systems provide these turtles with shelter for resting during the day and night. Hawksbills can be found around rocky outcrops and high-energy shoals, which are optimum sites for sponge growth.

Hawksbills nest on low- and high-energy beaches in tropical oceans of the world, frequently sharing high energy beaches with green turtles. Hawksbills will nest on small pocket beaches and, because of their small body size and agility, can cross fringing reefs that limit access by other species.

Diet

Sponges are the principal diet of hawksbills once they enter shallow coastal waters and begin feeding on the bottom. While diet studies have focused on the Caribbean, there is evidence that eating sponges is a worldwide feeding habit. A high degree of feeding selectivity is indicated by the consumption of a limited number of sponge species. Sponge predation by hawksbills may influence reef succession and diversity by freeing up space on the reef for settlement by benthic organisms. The hawksbill’s highly specific diet and its dependence on filter-feeding, hard-bottom communities make it vulnerable to deteriorating conditions on coral reefs around the world.

Reproduction

The nesting season of the hawksbill is longer than that of other sea turtles. Nesting occurs between May and December and courtship and mating begin somewhat earlier. Nesting in the Caribbean and Pacific is principally nocturnal, although rare daytime nesting does occur.

Nesting behaviour follows a general sequence of that of other species of sea turtles: emergence from the sea, site selection, site clearing and pit construction, egg chamber construction, egg laying, filling in the egg chamber, disguising the nest site, and returning to sea. The entire process takes about 1 to 3 hours.

Hawksbills nest on average 4.5 times a season and intervals of about 14 days. Hawksbills have a strong site fidelity to specific nesting beach areas and are capable of returning to the same place season after season. Clutch size is correlated to female carapace length. In pacific Costa Rica, clutch size is about 120 eggs. Eggs are about 40 mm in diameter and take about 60 days to hatch. Sex determination is likely temperature-dependent as in other sea turtles and many reptiles, but data is limited.

Threats

Hawksbills face most of the same dangers that all marine turtles face. Sadly, they are also singled out for their own special threat: humans find their shells highly attractive. The full extent of the threat is not known, but experts believe that the killing of hawksbills for shell material is a major problem.

Japan is the major consumer of turtle shell, but there is significant trade within the Caribbean as well. Although Japan has signed the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), it exempted itself from the ban on hawksbills (among others). Likewise, Cuba exempted itself, giving rise to a convenient trade opportunity. There is also a significant impact and concern for humans poaching nests for egg consumption throughout central America.

How You Can Help

The odds, unfortunately, are against the turtles. It is for this reason they need all the help they can get. Get involved and assist us in our conservation efforts by volunteering or making a donation.

Source: 4Biodiversity.org

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

~~ Help Waking Times to raise the vibration by sharing this article with the buttons below…

 

Tags: , , ,

Category: Activism, Animals, Contributors, Earth, Environment, Ideas, Inspiration, Resources, Self, Society, Transformation, Waking Times

Leave a Reply

Must Watch Videos

The Awakening – Clash of Civilizations

The Awakening – Clash of Civilizations













Zen Gardner, Guest
Waking Times

Despite the furious efforts of the world’s Machiavellian destroyers, humanity is waking up. We’re seeing significant progress in exposing the ongoing brutal Gaza extermination, the mass revelation of chemtrails and other neo-scientific incursions, the disastrous effects of EMFs of every source, GMO food manipulation, … More

July 23, 2014 | By | 4 Replies More
Raw Milk Versus Pasteurized—Which Is Safer?

Raw Milk Versus Pasteurized—Which Is Safer?













Dr. Mercola
Waking Times

The United States lags far behind many other nations when it comes to food safety and nutritional recommendations, and this is perhaps particularly true when it comes to raw milk.

The fact is, large dairy farmers operating under the factory farm model simply cannot produce raw … More

July 23, 2014 | By | Reply More
Toxic Hot Seat—What You Don’t Know About Flame Retardant Chemicals Can Hurt You

Toxic Hot Seat—What You Don’t Know About Flame Retardant Chemicals Can Hurt You













Dr. Mercola
Waking Times

Fear of fire is primal. No one wants to burn to death. This is undoubtedly why it’s so difficult to repeal laws relating to the use of fire retardant chemicals—even though experiments show they do not work… and worse, they’re actually exposing you to … More

July 21, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More
Humans of Manufactured Purpose

Humans of Manufactured Purpose













Raghav Bubna, Fractal Enlightenment
Waking Times

Until we are born we don’t have any perception of existence riddling within us, we are lovingly thrust into birth by the biological frivolity of corporeal matter and witness the first moments in our life of purest expression.

As children we interact through experience … More

July 18, 2014 | By | 2 Replies More
Not Just the Bees – Pesticides Wiping Out Birds Too

Not Just the Bees – Pesticides Wiping Out Birds Too













Heather Callaghan, Contributor
Waking Times

Netherlands researchers fear the second coming of Silent Spring.

“Neonicotinoids were always regarded as selective toxins. But our results suggest that they may affect the entire ecosystem,” says Hans de Kroon of Radboud University and co-author of a study recently published in Nature journal.… More

July 18, 2014 | By | 2 Replies More

Activism Works

Triumph For Citizens in Florida As Hughes Oil Company Drops Fracking Project

Triumph For Citizens in Florida As Hughes Oil Company Drops Fracking Project













Julie Dermansky, DeSmogBlog
Waking Times

On Friday morning, Dan A. Hughes Oil Company and the Collier Resources Company agreed to terminate their lease agreement, with the exception of the Collier Hogan 20-3H well, next to the Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary in Naples, Florida.

Hughes Oil dropped its plans to drill … More

July 14, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More
A Forgotten Community in New Orleans: Life on a Superfund Site

A Forgotten Community in New Orleans: Life on a Superfund Site













Julie Dermansky, DeSmogBlog
Waking Times

Shannon Rainey lives in a house that was built on top of a Superfund site in the Upper Ninth Ward of New Orleans.

“I bought my house when I was 25, and thirty years later, I still can’t get out,” she told DeSmogBlog.

Rainey’s … More

June 23, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More
Wave of GMO Labeling Victories Emboldens Movement to Take Back Food Democracy

Wave of GMO Labeling Victories Emboldens Movement to Take Back Food Democracy













Michele Simon, EcoWatch
Waking Times

The East Coast has been getting most of the attention lately on the state by state effort to label genetically-engineered food. Vermont recently passed a bill and New York State’s bill is now moving. But let’s not forget about the western states, which are also … More

June 11, 2014 | By | 1 Reply More
Monsanto’s Roundup Found in 75% of Air and Rain Samples

Monsanto’s Roundup Found in 75% of Air and Rain Samples













John Deike, EcoWatch
Waking Times

A new U.S. Geological Survey has concluded that pesticides can be found in, well, just about anything.

Roundup herbicide, Monsanto’s flagship weed killer, was present in 75 percent of air and rainfall test samples, according to the study, which focused on Mississippi’s highly fertile … More

May 27, 2014 | By | 2 Replies More
How to Bring Minerals Back Into the Soil and Food Supply

How to Bring Minerals Back Into the Soil and Food Supply













Dr. Mercola
Waking Times

There are now many studies clearly documenting that if you eat processed foods, you’re being exposed to toxic herbicides. These toxic chemicals have been found in everything from breast milk to umbilical cords and placentas.

This of course means that children are now born with a … More

May 26, 2014 | By | 3 Replies More